Classic Rock And Pop Music Blog

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This Land Is Your Land – American Folk Music Celebration

The inspiration for this playlist was my neighbor, who casually commented on one of my blog posts that she only knew folk music.  As my “about me” blog entry states “I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music.  I see my life in terms of music.” (Albert Einstein), I of course thought what a great idea for a new playlist!

American folk music encompasses several musical genres.  Songs tend to be traditional, often sung for generations, many tracing root back to Great Britain, mainland Europe, or Africa.  Non-electrified instruments are the norm in folk music, including acoustic guitar, banjo, mandolin, fiddle, upright bass, harmonica, and hand percussion. Mike Seeger, folk musician and half-brother to perhaps the most famous folk musician Pete Seeger, offered that American folk music is “all the music that fits between the cracks.”

In Folk Music, the earth sings, the mountains sing, the rivers flow, the crops sing.

Gandhi

I think American folk music can be described by paraphrasing US Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart’s famous 1964 quote to describe his threshold test for obscenity “I know it when I see it.”  I can’t fully define the parameters that define folk music, but “I know it when I hear it.” 

American folk music is a broad musical genre drawn from a wide array of musical traditions from populations and ethnic groups.  It includes several genres and themes, such as Appalachian music, bluegrass, railroad songs, protest songs, cowboy songs, and sea shanties.

Rising to popularity first in the 1930s thanks to the Carter Family, with songs such as “Will The Circle Be Unbroken.”  In the 1960s, folk music became a part of pop culture, with themes including the Civil Rights Movement as well as countercultural influences.  Popular folk singers included Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie, Joan Baez, Joni Mitchell, Peter, Paul & Mary, John Denver, Arlo Guthrie.  Also popular were The Kingston Trio, The Serendipity Singers, The Journeyman, The New Christy Minstrel, The Seekers, The Brothers Four, The Limelighters, and The Rooftop Singers.  Some folk blues and folk country artists appear, including Lead Belly, Mississippi John Hurt, Doc Watson, and Roy Acuff.  And even more mainstream folk and pop artists included Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, The Byrds, The Youngbloods, Crosby Stills & Nash, The Mamas & The Papas.  The Singer-Songwriters of the 70’s and 80’s, think Cat Stevens, James Taylor, Carole King, Jim Croce, Gordon Lightfoot, Harry Chapin, Don McLean, Dan Fogelberg, Tracy Chapman, often had folk offerings, though with a bit more of a pop sound, as part of their repertoire.  The folk tradition is being carried on by some current artists, including the likes of Bruce Springsteen, The Old Crow Medicine Show, Nickel Creek, Dave Rawlings, Sean Rowe, and Gillian Welch.

Music Themes include:

Spirituals, originating with white ministers setting European folk melodies to religious lyrics, as well as African American adaptations with themes including slavery and emancipation, such as “Swing Low Sweet Chariot,” “Go Tell It On The Mountain,” and “We Shall Overcome,”

Work Songs, including Cowboy Songs and Sea Shanties which functioned to lighten the burden of work and keep rhythm as a team, such as “Blow The Man Down” and “Shenandoah,” as well as Railroad Songs, such as “The Ballad of John Henry” and “Frieght Train.”

Protest songs were prominent in the 60s, with the very popular songs “If I Had A Hammer,” “Blowin’ In The Wind,” “The Times They Are A Changin,” and “Where Have All The Flowers Gone.”

Appalachian Music, such as “Wabash Cannonball” and “Will the Circle Be Unbroken”, with popular artists including the Carter Family and Doc Watson, influencing country artists such as Roy Acuff, Earl Scruggs, as well as Folk and Rock artists Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen, all included in this playlist.

My Spotify folk playlist “This Land Is Your Land” is organized (if you have the premium version of Spotify) as follows:

Standout folk songs: a collection of my favorites, by great folk artists

Female folk songs: a very “easy listening” style of folk

Wow, Mama Cass, Joni Mitchell – singing “Both Sides Now” and Mary Travers all in one room together:

And the same song from the Apple TV Academy Award winning movie CODA:

Pop/mainstream folk song: very pop styling, by the likes of The Byrds, Simon & Garfunkel, Gordon Lightfoot, and CSN (though a very limited selection of CSN songs on Spotify since Neil Young withdrew most of his music in protest of Spotify COVID misinformation podcasts)

Holy 60’s, Batman, check out The Byrds version of “The Times They Are A Changin’”

Guys & Gals folk songs: often lamenting lost love, unrequited love, bad blokes, or just songs in celebration of men and women.  Some of these are lots of fun, such as “Old Dan Tucker,” “Buffalo Gals,” “Cotton Eyed Joe,” “Clementine,” “Oh, Suzannah,” “Tom Dooley,” and “Mr. Bojangles.”

What a cool duet by James Taylor and Johnny Cash of “Oh, Susannah”:

Location folk songs: often invoking the countryside or wilderness, though sometimes cities, including “Angel From Montgomery,” “Coming Into Los Angeles,” “Cumberland Gap,” “Rocky Mountain High,” and “Yellow Rose of Texas.”

And who can forget Bonnie Raitt’s version of “Angel From Montgomery” from the No Nukes concert:

Railroad folk songs: with images of the railway or travel, such as “500 Miles,” “Freight Train,” and “Hobo’s Lullaby.”

And this version of “500 Miles” shocked me, performed by Justin Timberlake (really!):

Water and Sea folk songs: with images of sailing, the ocean or rivers, with “Calypso,” “Blow The Man Down,” and “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.”

I haven’t seen this Netflix series yet, but the cast sure does a great job singing “Blow The Man Down.”  You can see how these functioned as work songs:

Spiritual folk songs: including “Michael Row The Boat Ashore,” “Swing Low Sweet Chariot,” “I Saw The Light,” and “We Shall Overcome.”

Yet another movie I need to see, about Hank Williams, “I Saw The Light” (song clip at the end):

Assorted folk songs: more great folk songs by a variety of artists

“It Ain’t Me Babe” – Johnny Cash (covered by Joaquin Phoenix in Walk The Line)

Singer-songwriter folk songs: 70s and 80s singer-songwriters sang folk style and themed songs in their repertoire, such as James Taylor, Jim Croce, Don McLean, Harry Chapin, Dan Fogelberg, Carole King, and Tracy Chapman.

Kind of a cool video with a historical perspective of Dan Fogelberg’s “Sutter’s Mill.”  Again a true folk theme:

Modern folk songs: 21st century folk songs by contemporary artists including Bruce Springsteen, The Old Crow Medicine Show, Nickel Creek, Dave Rawlings, Gillian Welch and Sean Rowe.

I love Darius Rucker’s version of “Wagon Wheel” just as much as Old Crow Medicine Show’s.  From his video, you can see how well its theme fits into the folk genre.

I hope you have as much fun exploring this folk music as I have.

I hope that this music and my blog truly serve as a “revival: a new presentation of something old,” a springboard to return to the music of your youth, or perhaps to find artists you want to discover anew.  Rediscover the passion of music in your life.

Live in the moment.

Enjoy the moment.

Love the moment.

Listen to the MUSIC!

A Song For YOU & All I Want Is YOU – You Songs

On May 16, 1963 at the fifth annual Grammy Awards, Ray Charles won Best R&B Recording with “I Can’t Stop Loving You.”  On this day in 1966 The Beach Boys released their landmark album Pet Sounds, which included the song “You Still Believe In Me.”  This day in 1970 Randy Bachman left The Guess Who and recruited at Joe Walsh’s suggestion Winnipeg bassist and vocalist C.F. Turner to form Bachman-Turner Overdrive, with eventual hits “You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet” and “Hey You.”  And in 1987 on this day, U2 scored their first US #1 hit “With Or Without You” from the album The Joshua Tree (their follow up single “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” also shot to #1).  

What do these seemingly random facts have in common apart from occurring on the same date?  The song titles all contain the word “You,” which is the theme of this week’s playlists.  The task of creating playlists for You proved almost as daunting as that for the word Love highlighted in my November 6 playlists “Silly LOVE Songs” and “A Groovy Kind Of LOVE,” with the You lists containing over 250 songs, and Love lists 350 songs.  And the songs are simply amazing, ranging from the songs above to Gaga’s “You And I,”  The Stones’ “You Can’t Always Get What You Want,” Joe Jackson’s “You Can’t Get What You Want,” The Fray’s “You Found Me,” Bon Jovi’s “You Give Love A Bad Name,” Fleetwood Mac’s “You Make Loving Fun,” Billy Joel’s “You May Be Right.” The Beatles’ “You Never Give Me Your Money,” Hot Chocolate’s “You Sexy Thing,” AC/DC’s “You Shook Me All Night Long”  The list goes on and on.  Every song just fantastic.

Given the length, similar to the Love playlists, I listed songs in alphabetical order by songs starting with You then songs containing You later in the lyrics (order available only if you’re on the pay Spotify version).  With such a common, popular word in song titles, I obviously couldn’t include them all, lest you would be listening forever.  Hopefully I didn’t miss any of your favorites.  There are almost 18 hours of spectacular You songs that you won’t want to miss.  Great to listen to on your runs, workouts at the gym, long car rides, the songs can occupy your music listening time for quite a while.

In considering sharing some interesting videos to highlight the songs of the playlists, I decided to focus on songs with prominent placement in movies.  The first is a compilation of movie clips set to “I’ll Be Seeing You.”  From there follow songs from movies and TV that I’m sure you’ll be familiar with.  Enjoy!

Jimmy Durante “I’ll Be Seeing You” – movie compilation

The Rolling Stones “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” – The Big Chill

Madonna “Crazy For You” – Vision Quest

Madonna “You Must Love Me” – Evita (talk about reinventing herself every few years – almost unrecognizable as the same person…)

Simple Minds “Don’t You Forget About Me” – The Breakfast Club

Bryan Adams “(Everything I Do) I Do It For You” – Robin Hood Prince Of Thieves

Bryan Adams “Have You Ever Really Loved A Woman” – Don Juan de Marco

Olivia Newton John “Hopelessly Devoted To You” – Grease

Sonny & Cher “I Got You Babe” – Groundhog Day

Modern English “I Melt With You” – Valley Girl

Eric Clapton “It’s In The Way That You Use It” – The Color Of Money

Whitney Houston “I Will Always Love You” – The Bodyguard

Whitney Houston “Run To You” – The Bodyguard

Bob Dylan “Make You Feel My Love” – Life Itself

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVbP_STg-80

Frank Sinatra “The Way You Look Tonight” – Father Of The Bride

Carole King “Where You Lead” – Gilmore Girls

Glen Frey “You Belong To The City” – Miami Vice

Kristen Bell “Do You Want To Build A Snowman” – Frozen

OMD “If You Leave” – Pretty In Pink

Van Morrison “Someone Like You” – One Fine Day

Keb’ Mo’ “Just Like You” – One Fine Day

Lionel Richie “Say You, Say Me” – White Nights

Amanda Seyfried “Thank You For The Music” – Mamma Mia

Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey “When You Believe” – The Prince Of Egypt

Cliff Edwards “When You Wish Upon A Star” – Pinocchio

So here are the two playlists for your listening pleasure.  The first contains some of my favorite You songs, and the second playlist was to be “B sides”, though they are so good they can hardly be considered that.  Each of these playlist greats are “a song for you.”

I hope that this music and my blog truly serve as a “revival: a new presentation of something old,” a springboard to return to the music of your youth, or perhaps to find artists you want to discover anew.  Rediscover the passion of music in your life.

Live in the moment.

Enjoy the moment.

Love the moment.

Listen to the MUSIC!

Come DANCING – Dancing Songs

Two weeks ago my music blog featured songs with the word Dance in the title, with David Bowie’s “Let’s Dance” as its inspiration.  Today’s blog will somewhat expand on the theme with Dancing Songs.  After releasing my Dance blog, I received several suggestions of Dancing songs to add to the playlist, though I deferred adding, as the songs were already part of this planned playlist of Dancing songs.  So for those who suggested those Dancing songs, here they are.

In addition to the title song by the Kinks, some favorites include Van Halen’s or Martha & The Vandellas “Dancing In The Streets,” Billy Idol’s “Dancing With Myself,” Springsteen’s “Dancing In The Dark,” King Harvest’s “Dancing In The Moonlight.”  Then there’s a little disco flurry with Leo Sayer’s “You Make Me Feel Like Dancing” which I thought for the longest time was sung by the Bee Gees.  There are some great compilation videos on YouTube.  This first one with old school dance scenes featuring the likes of Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, and Shirley Temple:

And another featuring more recent famous movie and TV show scenes, created as a class project:

The Bee Gees are included with “You Should Be Dancing” made famous by John Travolta in “Saturday Night Fever”:

With younger brother Andy’s “Shadow Dancing”:

And Abba’s “Dancing Queen” getting a whole Greek village dancing in “Mamma Mia”:

Then there’s Pet Shop Boys’ “Domino Dancing” that I first heard in Macy’s cool teen floor in NYC in the 80’s.  Filmed in San Juan, Puerto Rico, the video is hot in more ways than one:

And before his tenure as American Idol judge, Lionel Richie was “Dancing On The Ceiling”:

Which reminds me of the old Fred Astaire dance scene from “Royal Wedding”, some 35 years before Lionel, in 1951:

I love that the YouTube poster clarifies “Of course Fred Astaire doesn’t really dance on the walls and ceiling.  The entire set rotated as Fred danced…”

Echo & The Bunnymen’s “Bring On The Dancing Horses” was made famous in John Hughes’ third Molly Ringwald feature “Pretty In Pink,” following “Sixteen Candles” and “The Breakfast Club.”  Other great songs appearing on that soundtrack, which I still own in vinyl, include The Psychedelic Furs title song, as well as Suzanne Vega’s “Left Of Center,” Orchestral Maneuvers In The Dark (OMD)’s “If You Leave” Danny Hutton, of Three Dog Night Fame, with “Wouldn’t It Be Nice,” and The Smiths “Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want,” among others, mostly songs of teen angst.  Also in the movie is one of my favorite musical scenes, one which turned me on to Otis Redding – who can forget Duckie dancing for all he’s worth to Otis’ “Try A Little Tenderness” – so great:

And while having no songs on the playlist, it’s hard to think about Dancing songs without images of several scenes from “Dirty Dancing” coming to mind,:

“Hey Baby” with Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Gray dancing on a log:

“Wipeout” with iconic scene with Jennifer Gray dancing on the bridge:

“Love Is Strange” lip synching to Mickey & Sylvia:

And of course, the finale scene “(I Had) The Time Of My Life”:

Interestingly, I stumbled upon their screen test for the movie, which is equally beautiful:

In a similar vein, “Footloose” conjures up some great dancing memories as well, with teens bringing dancing to their conservative town:

Going a little further back, who can forget Jennifer Beals (actually Irene Cara) in “Flashdance” thrilling her audience with her steal the show dancing scene with “Maniac”:

Then her final dance scene, with “What A Feeling”:

And scenes from the movie, definitely worth a watch for some early 80’s schmaltz:

And while featured in my Dance song blog “DANCE With Me,” this video compilation of famous movie dance scenes is too good to leave off:

So on to the playlist.  I think you’ll enjoy it.  Lots of great Dancing songs to tap your feet to:

I hope that this music and my blog truly serve as a “revival: a new presentation of something old,” a springboard to return to the music of your youth, or perhaps to find artists you want to discover anew.  Rediscover the passion of music in your life.

Live in the moment.

Enjoy the moment.

Love the moment.

Listen (Dancing) to the MUSIC!

Play Something SWEET – Sweet Songs

On April 17, 1971 all 4 Beatles had solo singles in the UK charts with “Power To The People” by John, “Another Day” by Paul, “My Sweet Lord” by George, and “It Don’t Come Easy” by Ringo.  It seems appropriate with Easter falling on April 17th this year to feature a playlist containing the song “My Sweet Lord” with Lord connecting with the religious aspect of the holiday, and Sweet to the secular celebration with the Easter Bunny and candy.  The theme of the playlist is songs containing the word “Sweet” in their title.

Harrison’s song was the first solo No.1 by a former Beatle.  He originally gave the song to Billy Preston to record.  This video version with Preston singing vocals features Eric Clapton, Jeff Lynne (of ELO fame), Dhani Harrison (George’s son) on guitars, with Paul McCartney on piano and Ringo Starr on drums.

Harrison’s song however does not reference the Judeo-Christian God Yaweh, but instead is in celebration of the Hindu god Krishna.  Featured on Harrison’s studio version are Preston, Ringo, Clapton, and Badfinger.  The song was one of Harrison and Preston’s favorites.

“My Sweet Lord” became the target of a copyright infringement lawsuit due to similarities to the 1963 Chiffons hit “He’s So Fine”. Harrison denied intentionally plagiarizing, though admitted to subconsciously lifting some of the melody was possible.  He admitted to borrowing some melodic lines from the out-of-copyright Christian hymn “Oh Happy Day.”  You be the judge:

“My Sweet Lord” superimposed with “He’s So Fine”:

“My Sweet Lord” and “Oh Happy Day” mashup:

While a few songs on the playlist don’t include the word “Sweet” in their title or lyrics, they seemed appropriate to include, for as a child, to me they were the epitome of sweets and treats.  I looked forward to watching “Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory” every year when it came on TV, back in the day before streaming, Blu-ray, DVD, and even VCR tapes.  I actually played Charlie in our 5th grade class production of “Charlie & The Chocolate Factory” (the original title of Ronald Dahl’s book, with Willy Wonka becoming the marketable feature of the movie thus the name change), perhaps because I was the smallest kid in my class!

The best candy store we had ever seen as kids, featured in “Candy Man”:

And Gene Wilder frolicking around the most heavenly candy room imaginable in “Pure Imagination.”  What we would have given to have our own golden ticket and entry to the candy room of every kid’s dreams:

And every year we couldn’t wait to see “Here Comes Peter Cottontail”:

But as they say, the reason for the season, in the Christian faith, best summarized in this video version of “New Again”:

On a different note, with a heavy heart I feel compelled pay tribute to my faithful pup who finally lost her valiant battle with heart disease this weekend.  She was a companion at my side for 10 years, often with her head on my lap while I had to use my laptop “side-saddle” to free up my lap for her.  And she slept on my pillow above my head at night, or in the crook of my arm, or with her head on my shoulder.  She was my little little girl.  I will miss her.

If you haven’t read “The Art Of Racing In The Rain” you should.  It’s very worth a read.  I haven’t watched the movie yet, but intend to.  The end scene I found on YouTube brings some comfort to a grieving heart:

Back to the playlist.  One song to highlight is “Sweet Caroline.”  During the 1997 game at Fenway, Amy Tobey, one of the employees in charge of music at the ballpark, played “Sweet Caroline” because a friend of hers had recently given birth to a baby named Caroline.  She became superstitious about its use over the next several years, only playing the song between the seventh and ninth innings when the Red Sox were in the lead.

That all changed in 2002 when the new Executive VP of Public Affairs Dr. Charles Steinberg set sight on making the song an integral part of the Fenway experience.  He requested the song be played at every game prior to the Red Sox batting in the 8th inning feeling the song had transformative powers to lift the spirits of the crowd and cheer on the team. 

“Sweet Caroline” figuring prominently in Fever Pitch

Neil Diamond further cemented the tie of the song to the Sox and Boston itself, revealing in 2007 that the song was about New England’s own Carline Kennedy.  He claimed he was inspired by a photograph he saw in a magazine of the 9 year-old Kennedy next to her pony impeccably dressed in her riding gear.  He has since recanted the story, stating the song was written about his wife, changing her name as the song musically called for a 3-syllables.  Whatever the inspiration, it has become an indelible part of the Boston experience:

And now for the playlist:

I hope that this music and my blog truly serve as a “revival: a new presentation of something old,” a springboard to return to the music of your youth, or perhaps to find artists you want to discover anew.  Rediscover the passion of music in your life.

Live in the moment.

Enjoy the moment.

Love the moment.

Listen to the SWEET MUSIC!

DANCE To The Music – Dance Songs

On April 9th 1983, David Bowie’s “Let’s Dance” hit No1 on the UK singles chart, his 4th of 5 UK No.1 hits (along with “Space Oddity” (1975), “Ashes to Ashes” (1980), “Under Pressure” with Queen (1981), and subsequently “Dancing in the Street” with Mick Jagger (1985).  Unbeknownst to me, the song featured blues guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan.  In re-listening to the song, I can hear his licks, though I feel Bowie severely underused his talent.

Bowie’s song lends the theme of today’s playlist, songs featuring the word “Dance” in their title, with a few “Danced” songs thrown in for good measure.  Though “Dancing” songs are not included, as they will be the topic of another playlist.

Along with Bowie’s classic, some other greats include the likes of “Do You Wanna Dance,” “Dance The Night Away,” “Dance To The Music,” “I Wanna Dance With Somebody,” “Last Dance,” “Dance With Me,” “Don’t Forget to Dance,” “Safety Dance,” and “Dance Hall Days.”

The lead song “Shut Up And Dance” is so much fun, and while the original video is great:

the movie compilation version is just amazing and a trip down movie memory lane:

While not on the playlist, I couldn’t help but include this video version of “Uptown Funk” in the blog post, as its such a great compilation of dance scenes from old Hollywood classics:

And Josh Turner’s “Why Don’t We Just Dance” has a similar “through the years” feel to it:

Then stepping back to 1987, for some classic Whitney with “I Wanna Dance With Somebody”:

A bit earlier in the 80s, 1983 to be exact, were the Kinks advising “Don’t Forget to Dance”:

Wang Chung provides more 80s fare with “Dance Hall Days.” Though who knew they had so many video versions. Two from the 80s, with this:

And this:

And then a modern update video that’s kinda fun:

With a more recent performance with the Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, and though much older, still able to Wang Chung tonight…

And if the 80s couldn’t get any zanier, Men Without Hats steps in the ring with their shenanigans in “Safety Dance”:

And Van Halen’s hard rock of 1979 with “Dance The Night Away”:

How about a little disco from Donna Summer with “Last Dance” in 1978:

Sly and the Family Stone’s performance of “Dance To The Music,” Soul Train gives insight to the late 60s to early 70s

There are some hidden gem romantic songs among the list, including Five For Fighting’s “This Dance,” Brad Paisley’s “We Danced,” and Steven Curtis Chapman’s “We Will Dance.”

And we will dance
When the sun is shining
In the pouring rain
We’ll spin and we’ll sway
And we will dance
When the gentle breeze
Becomes a hurricane
The music will play
And I’ll take your hand
And hold you close to me
And we will dance

Steven Curtis chapman “we will dance”

And while not including “Dance” in the title, this song just exudes dance from every note.  I just saw Steven Curtis Chapman live.  He was outstanding, and played this song in remembrance of his 5 year old daughter who died tragically.  This song has been the father-daughter dance song at many a wedding. 

So I will dance with Cinderella
While she is here in my arms
‘Cause I know something the prince never knew
Oh, I will dance with Cinderella
I don’t wanna miss even one song
‘Cause all too soon the clock will strike midnight
And she’ll be gone

steven curtis chapman “Cinderella”

Since Garth Brooks still isn’t available on Spotify, I thought I’d include a video of “The Dance” from GMA.  I danced to this song with my mom at my wedding as a tribute to my dad who had passed away several years prior:

And now I’m glad I didn’t know
The way it all would end, the way it all would go
Our lives are better left to chance
I could have missed the pain
But I’d have had to miss the dance

garth Brooks “the dance”

If you haven’t had a chance to watch Garth’s two-part special on Netfilx “The Road I’m On,” do so.  It’s so good, definitely worth a watch.  He’s quite a performer and person.

And to close out the blog post, this song, “Dance With My Father” seems appropriate, though I just discovered this version while researching videos.  I’m not sure how I never heard Celine’s version.  While it’s hard to imagine anyone being able to equal the vocal prowess of Luther Vandross on such a song, Celine is just the singer to be able to do so. And while sad, this song, along with Garth’s “The Dance” is a plea to not take moments with those we love for granted, and to cherish such memories that keep our loved once close after they pass:

If I could get another chance
Another walk, another dance with him
I’d play a song that would never ever end
How I’d love, love, love to dance with my father again

Luther vandross “dance with my father”

Though these two songs are a bit sad, overall the playlist is fun and upbeat, with lots of classic “Dance” songs.  Enjoy dancing to the music!

I hope that this music and my blog truly serve as a “revival: a new presentation of something old,” a springboard to return to the music of your youth, or perhaps to find artists you want to discover anew.  Rediscover the passion of music in your life.

Live in the moment.

Enjoy the moment.

Love the moment.

Listen (and Dance) to the MUSIC!

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